Tag Archives: New Balance running shoes

Running Shoe Review: New Balance 1400v2

new-balance-rc1400-v2

Is the New Balance 1400v2 a fast and efficient training and racing flat?

The New Balance 1400v2 is a lightweight flat – only 6.3 ounces in the men’s edition, that looks fast and feels fast. I spent some time in this shoe provided by New Balance and found it to be intriguing. Is it a winner? Look for our verdict below.

NB 1400v2

They must be making the sidewalks softer; at least that’s what I thought while walking in this model. The 1400v2 offers the easy comfortable feel of a bedroom slipper, something that’s typical of a racing flat. It’s remarkable that the shoe feels so well cushioned, coming in at under 6 and one-half ounces in weight. But the REVlite midsole cushioning does its job and does it well.

The shoe is relatively narrow but offers multiple lacing options which can be used to either loosen or tighten the fit. There are two center eyelets which you can elect to use or not. I made use of the eyelet that keeps the tongue in place, but not the one further down.

New-Balance-1400v2_3

The four bold colorways on the 1400v2 ensure that you will at least look fast at the starting line of a race. No guarantees on whether you’ll finish fast. I received the blue with blue atoll and neon green combination – which I really like, but the sulphur yellow with blue and race red colorway is also striking. (The other two options are a relatively simple blue with green combo, and the comparatively dull olive with yellow. Your running buddies will not need to wear sunglasses if you choose the latter iteration.)

I initially ran in the shoe on a gravel covered track where it felt protective but yet, yes, fast. According to the manufacturer, this model is “designed for efficient, fast training runs.” You may feel like Meb Keflezighi at the 18th mile of the Boston Marathon while running laps in this flat.

Despite the 1400v2’s light stature, it is not overly flexible and it provides a noticeable amount of stability on a track as well as on concrete. One’s feet land straight and stay that way; yes, this is efficient. This shoe feels like a lighter, racing version of the New Balance 890 series; the shoes clearly compliment each other quite well.

There’s just a touch of heel cushioning in the 1400v2, enough to make it comfortable for heel strikers. While the well-cushioned feel was present on a track and on concrete, I found that the shoe feels less cushioned on asphalt. This is likely a result of a fully flat, somewhat minimalist, sole interacting with an inherently uneven surface.

The forefoot on the 1400v2 has a smidgen of flexibility, but it’s not overly flexible, to the benefit of forefoot runners and toe strikers. The built-in firmness up front makes for a shoe that will hold up quite well on longer training runs and races.

I’ve often longed for a time machine that I could use to return to the days when Nike was turning out exemplary racing flats like the Pegasus Racer, the Air Myriad, and the great, classic Ghost Racer. Having been introduced to the 1400v2, it may be time to let go of that wish.

Verdict:

The New Balance 1400v2 is a lightweight, versatile shoe that should work well for many runners as both a daily trainer and as a shoe to wear for a 5K or 10K race. The one exception would be those with wide feet. Most racing flats are built for narrow feet, after all.

Runners who currently train in the New Balance 890v4 neutral cushioning running shoe may elect to purchase the 1400v2 and use it as their race day shoe.

The 1400v2 may be a great half-marathon to marathon trainer-racer for those who are built sleek and run sleek. At a list price of $99.99 it’s a bargain (and it’s currently being sold for even less on the New Balance website). You may want to pick up a pair before the 1400v3 is released.

Highly recommended.

Joseph Arellano

Note: The 1400v2 has a 10mm drop (heel to toe drop).

This review first appeared on the Blogcritics site:

http://blogcritics.org/running-shoe-review-new-balance-1400v2/

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new-balance-rc1400-v2

A running shoe review! We take a look at the New Balance 1400v2 trainer/racing flat.

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Running Shoe Review: New Balance 870v3 and 890v3

A look at two New Balance running trainers. Which model might be best for most runners?

NB 870v3

If you love the feel of the New Balance (NB) 880v3 neutral trainer but need a bit of support you may want to consider the NB 870v3 model. This is a stability trainer with an 8mm heel offset. It weighs 9.8 ounces. The shoe has a friendly, slightly wider than average fit that does not require you to have the narrowest of feet.

The underfoot cushioning of the 870v3 is immediately apparent in part because the slip-lasted model has a flexible blown rubber forefoot. The shoe has a REVlite midsole that offers a fine amount of protection for one’s feet. Support for mild to moderate pronators is provided in the form of a relatively firm, but non-obtrusive, medial post (some efficient runners might not notice the post while running).

The 870v3 should serve as a well cushioned and durable shoe for runners who train on a variety of surfaces, both hard and soft. But some runners will look for a lighter and perhaps more personally exciting shoe, and this brings us to the NB 890v3.

New Balance 890v3

Some will remember the NB 900 neutral training running shoes line. These were low-to-the-ground lightweight trainers that were great for running under all conditions and on almost all surfaces. I ran in most of these models and I sometimes still jog in a pair of the now-classic NB 903s from 2008. The NB 890v3 reminds me of the old 900s.

The third iteration of the 890 is a lightweight neutral trainer that weighs between 9.1 and 9.55 ounces (depending on the data source) and comes with a 8mm heel drop. It’s semi-curved and has a low toe-box, but enough room up front that it does not become an issue. The 890v3 has a unique fit and feel reminiscent of a late 80s/early 90s racing flat. The fit is snug and secure — with the added bonus of more than sufficient protective foam around the ankles — and this is achieved without tight lacing. The colorful flat laces can be tied quickly and do not come loose or undone.

The 890v3 has a nicely cushioned insole and REVlite midsole; together these provide a bounce you can feel in the shoe’s ride. The fully blown rubber sole is ultra-flexible, a bit of good news for both forefoot strikers and those with inflexible feet. The sole is a hybrid-patterned one, flat enough to be used on roads and nubby enough for trail runs.

On sidewalks the shoe transforms heel strikers into mid-foot strikers, a positive thing, while providing protective cushioning. The NB 890v3 offers great energy return on asphalt; on this surface the shoe feels fast. The NB 890v3 would be a good choice for a 5K to a half-marathon shoe for most runners, and it would clearly be a desirable marathon shoe for efficient runners.

I found this model to be near wondrous on a hard-packed dirt trail as the very flexible sole allows the feet to “ramble tamble” at will (whatever John Fogerty meant by that). The shoe may be wondrous enough to foster “wanderous” training runs.

On a crushed gravel track the 890v3 lets your foot dig in while providing an exemplary level of protection on what can be a wearing surface for tender feet and metatarsals. On an oval track the shoe seems to adjust to any foot landing pattern — forefoot, mid-foot or heel striking.

While the NB 890v3 is technically a neutral shoe, I suspect that a wide variety of runners could train and race in it (exempting Clydesdales and moderate-to-severe pronators).

New-Balance-890V3-Sole-620x340

The grippy sole on the NB 890v3 means that it’s a shoe I would choose and feel free to run in on a rainy, slick and slippery day. This model breathes confidence in its apparent ability to come through under any conditions, something which breeds confidence in the person wearing the shoes.

If you’re headed to your local running store to try out models like the Mizuno Wave Sayonara and the Saucony Mirage 3, you may want to also do a trial run in the New Balance 890v3. There’s a chance that your heart and/or your feet may fall in love with the shoe.

Highly recommended.

Joseph Arellano

These New Balance models were either manufactured or assembled in the United States.

The 870v3 is well recommended.

This article originally appeared on the Blogcritics website:

http://blogcritics.org/running-shoe-review-new-balance-870v3-and-890v3/

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NB 870v3

New Balance 890v3

A running shoe review! We take a look at two models from New Balance, the 870v3 stability trainer and the 890v3 lightweight neutral trainer.

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Running Shoe Review: The New Balance 880 v2

New Balance 880v2

The New Balance (NB) 880 v2 (v2 stands for version two) is a modern classic cushioned running shoe that will help some avoid the agony of the feet. The shoe presents itself with a nice medium-wide fit, and a better fit in the arch area. Heel strikers will love the exemplary build-up of solid padding in the rear; more than a bit reminiscent of the Nike Air Max running shoes of the ’90s. The raised heel will please traditionalists who aren’t rushing out the door to pick up a pair of minimalist running shoes.

The NB 880 v2 forefoot is extremely flexible which can help to prevent toe cramping in some runners with relatively inflexible (read, flat) feet. The insole allows the toes to lie flat, and there’s no apparent metatarsal pad bump – something that can actually irritate those with existing metatarsal issues. And there’s a midfoot stability under arch wedge plate which fortunately does not interfere with one’s normal running style, neutral or otherwise.

The underfoot cushioning seems to be of the Goldilocks “just right” variety – enough to protect against rough road surfaces but not enough to deaden the enjoyment of the ride. Even better, while the sole returns some energy to the active runner it does not create a distracting bounce.

The lacing of the 880 v2 is off-center which reduces pressure on the sometimes sensitive upper-foot area.

This particular running shoe may be a bit hard to find as New Balance has begun to release some of its v3 (version three) models such as the NB 890 v3. I ordered my pair with the assistance of a local running store offering a discount on special orders. The good news is that once the NB 880 v3 is released, you should be able to order the 880 v2 – as an “endangered” shoe – via several discount online running shoe purveyors. However, you may want to order a pair right now to ensure that you can get it in your size.

The NB 880 v2 is a running shoe that provides a significant amount of protection for the feet while not attempting to modify one’s natural running style. This makes it a bit of a rarity these days. It’s also a running shoe that comes in nice, not garish, colors and it’s made in the U.S.A. (in either Boston or Lawrence, Massachusetts or Norridgewock, Maine).

If the NB 880 v2 was a car, it might well be a cozy, comfortable and smooth riding Nissan Ultima – an automobile that’s made in the U.S.A. (Smyrna, Tennessee). No complaints here.

Highly recommended.

Joseph Arellano

These shoes were purchased at The Running Zone in Elk Grove, California.

This article originally appeared on the Blogcritics Sports website:

http://blogcritics.org/sports/article/running-shoe-review-the-new-balance/

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A review of the New Balance 880 v2 cushioned running shoe!

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